Puck | The Fae

Basic Info

Character Name

Puck

Species

Fae

Found in Chapter…

Chapter one

Storyline Includes:

  • Multiple scenarios
  • Chastity cage
  • Edging and denial
  • Oral
  • BDSM
  • Dom/sub
  • Game play
  • voyeurism
  • Manipulation

Artwork Gallery

More to the story…

Elves, piksies, brownies, puccas, hobgoblins, gnomes, kelpies, spriggans, banshees, changelings, hags, wisps and redcaps are only a few of the strange and awful creatures the human world knows as fairies.

They abide in every culture across the world, and the folklore concerning them is so diverse that there is no telling what the truth of it is. In fact, you would be hard pressed to prove that there is any truth behind them whatsoever, as the nature of fairies seems to be as unfaithful and quixotic as the creatures themselves. What little can be gleaned from folklore and mythology is uncertain, and so it is considered best to avoid association with the good folk in any way, even down to refusing to acknowledge them by the word ‘fairies’ as it is thought to draw their attention.

However, should you find yourself among these terrible and flighty beasts, there are things which you would do well to commit to memory. They might just save your life, though, after a meeting with the fae, there is no telling what kind of condition your life will be in.

The most important thing to remember is names have power. Never, ever give one of the folk your real name for any reason. You will need to employ trickery in order to do this, as they can be very clever in sussing it out. Give them something else to call you, but don’t lie either. They can tell if you lie directly, and it will almost certainly enrage them. For instance, if you are a redhead, tell them they can call you Ginger. You are, after all, ginger-haired, so you aren’t telling them to call you something which you are not. They will not give you their real names either, so don’t expect it. But if you can trick them into revealing their true names, you have just been given a gift more precious than gold! You can invoke their names to demand their obedience to you but use it wisely. Fae folk have been known to go to extreme lengths to rid themselves of someone who abuses the privilege.

The second most important thing to remember is that the folk do not lie. But they do not always tell the truth either. They work their words in such a way as to beguile and confuse you, seemingly for no other purpose than to enjoy your dismay and anxiety over the situation. Do not trust them, but listen closely to what they tell you. Often they will hide information in limericks or riddles in order to get you to earn what you are after. It’s been said that the folk will amuse themselves by trying to confound one another with riddles. After all, if you can confound a fae, you will have earned its respect at the very least!

Something to know is that the folk like to play games. In an eternal life span, there must be plenty of boredom, which can lead to melancholy or capricious behavior. Wars have been started because factions got bored after nothing to do for centuries and decided to stir up trouble. If you find yourself trapped among the fae with no escape, challenge them to a game for your freedom. They will never refuse, and will almost always let you pick the game and the rules, as they are prone to arrogance. They will insist on a bet, which as far as they are concerned is a binding contract. If you are clever, be very clever, as you may be surprised as to their method of extracting payment. A young woman, when ensnared, once gambled half her life away to the fae if they would let her go. They accepted the offer but took the half from the beginning. She lost all memories from the first fifteen years of her life and had to relearn everything as if she were an infant. Never bet anything you are not willing to lose.

If you find yourself in a situation where you are offered food or drink, do not accept it under any circumstances! Even if you are parched with thirst or starving, do not eat or drink while under their attendance. For one thing, the fae have been known to trick humans. They will make you think you are eating grapes only for the glamour to wear off and find you have been crunching live beetles! But even that is preferable, as insects could be argued not to count as food. If you eat from the table, you will not be allowed to leave until you have repaid the meal set by your host. Often times the repayment comes in the form of servitude for an extended period of time, normally longer than most humans live.

The folk have factions, like any group of ‘civilized’ folk. A solitary fae is untithed, owing no loyalty or allegiance to anyone. They have a tendency towards selfishness and impulsive decision, as the outcome affects only themselves. This can be turned against them, but will usually end in them seeking some form of retribution, as there is no one to reign them in and enforce the rules.

A group of fae is often called a ring, and of course, every ring has a ringleader. They are usually untithed fae who have banded together out of a desire for company. The ringleader is whoever they fear the most, or whoever is the most powerful of the group. If caught in a ring, you can always appeal to the ringleader by promising to do them a favor in exchange for your freedom. However, this can’t be trusted to be upheld, as the position of ringleader is subject to change depending upon the fluctuation of the group dynamics. Today’s ringleader may be tomorrows corpse. Make your deal, make it fast, and get out of the territory as soon as possible.

A large group of fairies is called either a revelry or a court, both of which are respective to who is presiding. A revelry is essentially a gathering of untithed fae who have come together under a more powerful and threatening leader. The leader will often come up with a name for themselves which alludes to nobility but do not be fooled. They owe no allegiance to any of the respective Kings or Queens of the realms and will do as they please. Some known nom de plumes are the Lord of Stags, the Crag-faced Woman, and the Golden Lady. If you become trapped in a revelry, you have two choices. One is to be as amusing and pleasing to them as possible. The untithed are always sick for amusements and if they find you to be enjoyable, they will be more likely to show favor. However, since what they consider amusing is all too often lethal for humans, your second option is to appeal to the leader of the group and offer your service in some way. You stand a much better chance with this as a more powerful leader is more likely to stay in charge.

A court, on the other hand, is a large group of folk who have sworn their loyalty and allegiance to one of the noble fae that presides over the factions. A court often prides itself on it’s seeming order and civility, and so it’s more likely that you will survive an encounter depending upon which faction they are sworn to. If you get picked up by a court, you don’t have to worry until you are presented to their presiding Host. You can always offer your services, but they are far more easily swayed by gifts and flattery, as they have plenty of underlings to serve them. If you can sing or play an instrument, you’ll be quick to get on their good side, especially if the song is composed in dedication to them. A clever person might ‘invent’ a sport to keep them entertained, as they are as prone to gambling and games as all of their ilk.

There are many factions of the folk, but they can largely be split into two groups; Seelie and Unseelie. The Seelie faction is what most humans would associate with fairies. They are bright, pastoral and radiant folk, often beautiful to behold. They are proud and romantic creatures, dwelling in a realm of sunlight and eternal summer. They are well known for passing blessings to humans who please them, as they see themselves as being very kind and generous fae who disdain all the repugnant and unpleasant things that plague humanity. But do not be fooled. They are no less capricious, and sometimes far more malevolent behind their glowing masks of carefree brilliance. A King or Queen of the Seelie is the ultimate power in any realm, or so they will tell you, and to defy them is to ensure your own demise.

There was once a tale of a young man who found himself within the midst of a summer picnic hosted by none other than a Seelie Queen. He fell in love with her at first sight and pledged his undying fealty to her if she would but permit him to kiss her hand. The queen allowed for them, because he was very handsome, and allowed him to dine with them for the night. When morning came, the young man found himself alone and addle-brained. He returned to his family, whispering tales of a beautiful woman who he had promised to wait for until she returned to him. He would not eat, would not drink, would not clean himself until she returned.

His wife and children left him, and eventually, he died of pining for the mysterious Queen. At his wake, a strange woman appeared. She refused to enter a building where death was, and could not be persuaded to come to the church the next morning. But around his grave, a swatch of poppies grew, even in the dead of winter. Everyone knew then what had happened to their young man, and they warned their children for decades after what came of falling in love with unknown women.

The Unseelie court is no less fae, but far less fairy than what one would expect. From a kinder viewpoint, the Unseelie have an abiding appreciation for the dark and terrible things of the world. They find beauty in a peat bog and content in a bat-filled cavern. They are prone to drunken, licentious behavior, and often can be found cavorting with untithed revelries on moonlit nights. They are amused by the sufferings of the world and take enjoyment in increasing them whenever they have an excuse. They are a torment to fae and human alike, especially when they have been given a reason to be cruel. Cannibalism is not unknown among them, especially if their King or Queen has been moved to fury. They find most attempts at flattery to be sickeningly sweet and will claim it an insult if you try to gain their favor in such a manner. Be wary, because if you offer them service or a gift, they will demand something you can’t bear to part with.

There was a story passed around about a woman who found herself in amid an Unseelie court. All manner of wights and hobgoblins sat about her, gnashing their teeth and making threatening motions as they tore at her skirts. She was drug up to the host of the group and beheld him sitting on a throne made of gnarled oak. He demanded that she give him something to make up for her trespassing into his realm. Now she was a good woman, who had long ago decided that she would be going into a life of service as a nun. Thinking that she was being clever, she offered the host her first born child if he would just let her live. The Unseelie host accepted, and she was escorted to the edge of the wood. However, by the year she came of age, the young woman had fallen in love with a lively hunter, who married her that summer. As thing will, she became pregnant, and as her belly began to swell, she heard a knock at the door. She opened it to find a hobgoblin there, sharp teeth clicking about. He’d come to inform her that her husband had died while hunting in the woods, and the Unseelie host had sent him to ensure she would want for nothing while she carried the child. After all, said the hob, it belonged to her gracious host.

For nine months she tried everything she could to trick her way out of the situation. She killed a chick and collected its blood, pretending that she had miscarried in the night. The hob poked her belly with a sharp stick, and when she defended it, he laughed. “Whot you protectin iffen there ain’t nothun in there missy?” She had a woodcarver make a baby out of birch and swaddled it, making crying and howling noises until the hob came to snatch it away. Once he had the false infant, she climbed out through the window and tried to saddle the hose, but the hob and made it lame and she could still not escape.

Finally, when the day came and she had no choice but to give the child over, she held it in, determined that any child of her’s would not be given over to become a plaything of the Unseelie host. The hob, at his wit’s end, left. But he returned the next evening, and with him came the woman’s husband.

“It can no be possible. You died.” She insisted, guarding the newly born child with an iron knife in her hand.

“I did not. For in fact the man you knew never lived.” And then he changed shape, becoming the Unseelie host. “The child you protect with such ferocity is mine, who you carried well and now protect with teeth bared as a mother bear protecting her cubs.” His smile was like a firebrand, and his eyes were like mirrors. “Such tenacity does not go unappreciated by me and mine. And if you so choose sweet mother, you can come with the child, and dwell in my court.”

The next morning the house was found to be empty, mother and child gone. Blood stained the mattress, which was to be expected after an unattended pregnancy. But the village never knew what became of the young woman and her child.

There are ways to protect yourself, though they should be used with caution. Be especially wary around the times of Midsummer and Halloween. The folk are known to be on the prowl during these nights. Beware of the woods during the full moon, rivers shrouded with fog, and strange lights flitting between the trees. Iron and rowan berries are said to ward them off, and no fey can abide the sound of a church bell in their ears. In fact, they can not seem to stand being on any hallowed ground, though you may find yourself unable to leave as they will prowl around the outskirts until they can catch you. Seelie, in particular, abhor death and disease, and will even avoid going near anyone with a black dog as that can be associated with omens of death. If you suspect yourself being harassed by the fae for no purpose but amusement, leave buttermilk, wine or honey and bread outside for them, and they will likely let you be.